Shark in the blue sex games. ДЛЯ ПОДТВЕРЖДЕНИЯ, ЧТО ВЫ СТАРШЕ 18-ТИ, ПОЖАЛУЙСТА, АВТОРИЗИРУЙТЕСЬ ЧЕРЕЗ ВК.



Shark in the blue sex games

Shark in the blue sex games

Shark tooth The teeth of tiger sharks are oblique and serrated to saw through flesh Shark teeth are embedded in the gums rather than directly affixed to the jaw, and are constantly replaced throughout life. Multiple rows of replacement teeth grow in a groove on the inside of the jaw and steadily move forward in comparison to a conveyor belt ; some sharks lose 30, or more teeth in their lifetime.

The rate of tooth replacement varies from once every 8 to 10 days to several months. In most species, teeth are replaced one at a time as opposed to the simultaneous replacement of an entire row, which is observed in the cookiecutter shark. The teeth of plankton-feeders such as the basking shark are small and non-functional. Sharks and other cartilaginous fish skates and rays have skeletons made of cartilage and connective tissue.

Cartilage is flexible and durable, yet is about half the normal density of bone. This reduces the skeleton's weight, saving energy. The jaw's surface in comparison to the shark's vertebrae and gill arches needs extra support due to its heavy exposure to physical stress and its need for strength. It has a layer of tiny hexagonal plates called " tesserae ", which are crystal blocks of calcium salts arranged as a mosaic.

Generally sharks have only one layer of tesserae, but the jaws of large specimens, such as the bull shark, tiger shark, and the great white shark, have two to three layers or more, depending on body size. The jaws of a large great white shark may have up to five layers. Fins Fin skeletons are elongated and supported with soft and unsegmented rays named ceratotrichia, filaments of elastic protein resembling the horny keratin in hair and feathers. Sharks can only drift away from objects directly in front of them because their fins do not allow them to move in the tail-first direction.

This works as an outer skeleton, providing attachment for their swimming muscles and thus saving energy. Caudal fin shapes vary considerably between shark species, due to their evolution in separate environments.

Sharks possess a heterocercal caudal fin in which the dorsal portion is usually noticeably larger than the ventral portion.

This is because the shark's vertebral column extends into that dorsal portion, providing a greater surface area for muscle attachment. This allows more efficient locomotion among these negatively buoyant cartilaginous fish. By contrast, most bony fish possess a homocercal caudal fin. The tiger shark must be able to twist and turn in the water easily when hunting to support its varied diet, whereas the porbeagle shark , which hunts schooling fish such as mackerel and herring , has a large lower lobe to help it keep pace with its fast-swimming prey.

Physiology Buoyancy Unlike bony fish, sharks do not have gas-filled swim bladders for buoyancy. Instead, sharks rely on a large liver filled with oil that contains squalene , and their cartilage, which is about half the normal density of bone. Sand tiger sharks store air in their stomachs, using it as a form of swim bladder. Bottom-dwelling sharks, like the nurse shark , have negative buoyancy, allowing them to rest on the ocean floor.

Some sharks, if inverted or stroked on the nose, enter a natural state of tonic immobility. Researchers use this condition to handle sharks safely. Unlike other fish, shark gill slits are not covered, but lie in a row behind the head.

A modified slit called a spiracle lies just behind the eye, which assists the shark with taking in water during respiration and plays a major role in bottom—dwelling sharks.

Spiracles are reduced or missing in active pelagic sharks. While at rest, most sharks pump water over their gills to ensure a constant supply of oxygenated water. A small number of species have lost the ability to pump water through their gills and must swim without rest.

These species are obligate ram ventilators and would presumably asphyxiate if unable to move. Obligate ram ventilation is also true of some pelagic bony fish species. Here the shark pumps blood to its gills via the ventral aorta artery where it branches into afferent brachial arteries.

Reoxygenation takes place in the gills and the reoxygenated blood flows into the efferent brachial arteries, which come together to form the dorsal aorta. The blood flows from the dorsal aorta throughout the body. The deoxygenated blood from the body then flows through the posterior cardinal veins and enters the posterior cardinal sinuses.

From there blood enters the heart ventricle and the cycle repeats. Members of the family Lamnidae such as the shortfin mako shark and the great white shark are homeothermic and maintain a higher body temperature than the surrounding water. In these sharks, a strip of aerobic red muscle located near the center of the body generates the heat, which the body retains via a countercurrent exchange mechanism by a system of blood vessels called the rete mirabile "miraculous net".

The common thresher and bigeye thresher sharks have a similar mechanism for maintaining an elevated body temperature. This adaptation prevents most sharks from surviving in freshwater, and they are therefore confined to marine environments. A few exceptions exist, such as the bull shark , which has developed a way to change its kidney function to excrete large amounts of urea. The food moves from the mouth to a J-shaped stomach, where it is stored and initial digestion occurs.

This short length is achieved by the spiral valve with multiple turns within a single short section instead of a long tube-like intestine. The valve provides a long surface area, requiring food to circulate inside the short gut until fully digested, when remaining waste products pass into the cloaca. Sharks have keen olfactory senses, located in the short duct which is not fused, unlike bony fish between the anterior and posterior nasal openings, with some species able to detect as little as one part per million of blood in seawater.

They are more attracted to the chemicals found in the intestines of many species, and as a result often linger near or in sewage outfalls. Some species, such as nurse sharks , have external barbels that greatly increase their ability to sense prey. Sight Eye of a Bigeyed sixgill shark Hexanchus nakamurai Shark eyes are similar to the eyes of other vertebrates , including similar lenses , corneas and retinas , though their eyesight is well adapted to the marine environment with the help of a tissue called tapetum lucidum.

This tissue is behind the retina and reflects light back to it, thereby increasing visibility in the dark waters. The effectiveness of the tissue varies, with some sharks having stronger nocturnal adaptations. Many sharks can contract and dilate their pupils , like humans, something no teleost fish can do. Sharks have eyelids, but they do not blink because the surrounding water cleans their eyes.

To protect their eyes some species have nictitating membranes. This membrane covers the eyes while hunting and when the shark is being attacked. However, some species, including the great white shark Carcharodon carcharias , do not have this membrane, but instead roll their eyes backwards to protect them when striking prey. The importance of sight in shark hunting behavior is debated.

Some believe that electro- and chemoreception are more significant, while others point to the nictating membrane as evidence that sight is important. Presumably, the shark would not protect its eyes were they unimportant. The use of sight probably varies with species and water conditions. The shark's field of vision can swap between monocular and stereoscopic at any time. The remaining seven species had in addition to rods a single type of cone photoreceptor sensitive to green and, seeing only in shades of grey and green, are believed to be effectively colorblind.

The study indicates that an object's contrast against the background, rather than colour, may be more important for object detection. The lateral line shows a similar arrangement, and is open to the environment via a series of openings called lateral line pores. This is a reminder of the common origin of these two vibration- and sound-detecting organs that are grouped together as the acoustico-lateralis system. In bony fish and tetrapods the external opening into the inner ear has been lost.

Electromagnetic field receptors ampullae of Lorenzini and motion detecting canals in the head of a shark Electroreception Main article: Electroreception The ampullae of Lorenzini are the electroreceptor organs. They number in the hundreds to thousands. Sharks use the ampullae of Lorenzini to detect the electromagnetic fields that all living things produce. The shark has the greatest electrical sensitivity of any animal.

Sharks find prey hidden in sand by detecting the electric fields they produce. Ocean currents moving in the magnetic field of the Earth also generate electric fields that sharks can use for orientation and possibly navigation.

Lateral line This system is found in most fish, including sharks. It detects motion or vibrations in water. Most live 20 to 30 years. The spiny dogfish has one of the longest lifespans at more than years. Fecundity in sharks ranges from 2 to over young per reproductive cycle. For example, lemon sharks reach sexual maturity at around age 13— In less flexible species the two sharks swim parallel to each other while the male inserts a clasper into the female's oviduct.

Females in many of the larger species have bite marks that appear to be a result of a male grasping them to maintain position during mating. The bite marks may also come from courtship behavior: In some species, females have evolved thicker skin to withstand these bites. The extent of this behavior in the wild is unknown. Mammals are now the only major vertebrate group in which asexual reproduction has not been observed. Scientists say that asexual reproduction in the wild is rare, and probably a last-ditch effort to reproduce when a mate is not present.

Asexual reproduction diminishes genetic diversity , which helps build defenses against threats to the species. Species that rely solely on it risk extinction. Asexual reproduction may have contributed to the blue shark 's decline off the Irish coast. The young continue to be nourished by the remnants of the yolk and the oviduct's fluids. As in viviparity, the young are born alive and fully functional. Lamniforme sharks practice oophagy , where the first embryos to hatch eat the remaining eggs.

Taking this a step further, sand tiger shark pups cannibalistically consume neighboring embryos. The survival strategy for ovoviviparous species is to brood the young to a comparatively large size before birth. The whale shark is now classified as ovoviviparous rather than oviparous, because extrauterine eggs are now thought to have been aborted.

Most ovoviviparous sharks give birth in sheltered areas, including bays, river mouths and shallow reefs. They choose such areas for protection from predators mainly other sharks and the abundance of food.

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Shark in the blue sex games

Shark tooth The teeth of tiger sharks are oblique and serrated to saw through flesh Shark teeth are embedded in the gums rather than directly affixed to the jaw, and are constantly replaced throughout life.

Multiple rows of replacement teeth grow in a groove on the inside of the jaw and steadily move forward in comparison to a conveyor belt ; some sharks lose 30, or more teeth in their lifetime. The rate of tooth replacement varies from once every 8 to 10 days to several months.

In most species, teeth are replaced one at a time as opposed to the simultaneous replacement of an entire row, which is observed in the cookiecutter shark. The teeth of plankton-feeders such as the basking shark are small and non-functional. Sharks and other cartilaginous fish skates and rays have skeletons made of cartilage and connective tissue. Cartilage is flexible and durable, yet is about half the normal density of bone. This reduces the skeleton's weight, saving energy.

The jaw's surface in comparison to the shark's vertebrae and gill arches needs extra support due to its heavy exposure to physical stress and its need for strength. It has a layer of tiny hexagonal plates called " tesserae ", which are crystal blocks of calcium salts arranged as a mosaic. Generally sharks have only one layer of tesserae, but the jaws of large specimens, such as the bull shark, tiger shark, and the great white shark, have two to three layers or more, depending on body size.

The jaws of a large great white shark may have up to five layers. Fins Fin skeletons are elongated and supported with soft and unsegmented rays named ceratotrichia, filaments of elastic protein resembling the horny keratin in hair and feathers. Sharks can only drift away from objects directly in front of them because their fins do not allow them to move in the tail-first direction.

This works as an outer skeleton, providing attachment for their swimming muscles and thus saving energy. Caudal fin shapes vary considerably between shark species, due to their evolution in separate environments.

Sharks possess a heterocercal caudal fin in which the dorsal portion is usually noticeably larger than the ventral portion.

This is because the shark's vertebral column extends into that dorsal portion, providing a greater surface area for muscle attachment.

This allows more efficient locomotion among these negatively buoyant cartilaginous fish. By contrast, most bony fish possess a homocercal caudal fin. The tiger shark must be able to twist and turn in the water easily when hunting to support its varied diet, whereas the porbeagle shark , which hunts schooling fish such as mackerel and herring , has a large lower lobe to help it keep pace with its fast-swimming prey. Physiology Buoyancy Unlike bony fish, sharks do not have gas-filled swim bladders for buoyancy.

Instead, sharks rely on a large liver filled with oil that contains squalene , and their cartilage, which is about half the normal density of bone. Sand tiger sharks store air in their stomachs, using it as a form of swim bladder. Bottom-dwelling sharks, like the nurse shark , have negative buoyancy, allowing them to rest on the ocean floor.

Some sharks, if inverted or stroked on the nose, enter a natural state of tonic immobility. Researchers use this condition to handle sharks safely. Unlike other fish, shark gill slits are not covered, but lie in a row behind the head. A modified slit called a spiracle lies just behind the eye, which assists the shark with taking in water during respiration and plays a major role in bottom—dwelling sharks.

Spiracles are reduced or missing in active pelagic sharks. While at rest, most sharks pump water over their gills to ensure a constant supply of oxygenated water. A small number of species have lost the ability to pump water through their gills and must swim without rest. These species are obligate ram ventilators and would presumably asphyxiate if unable to move. Obligate ram ventilation is also true of some pelagic bony fish species.

Here the shark pumps blood to its gills via the ventral aorta artery where it branches into afferent brachial arteries. Reoxygenation takes place in the gills and the reoxygenated blood flows into the efferent brachial arteries, which come together to form the dorsal aorta.

The blood flows from the dorsal aorta throughout the body. The deoxygenated blood from the body then flows through the posterior cardinal veins and enters the posterior cardinal sinuses. From there blood enters the heart ventricle and the cycle repeats.

Members of the family Lamnidae such as the shortfin mako shark and the great white shark are homeothermic and maintain a higher body temperature than the surrounding water.

In these sharks, a strip of aerobic red muscle located near the center of the body generates the heat, which the body retains via a countercurrent exchange mechanism by a system of blood vessels called the rete mirabile "miraculous net". The common thresher and bigeye thresher sharks have a similar mechanism for maintaining an elevated body temperature.

This adaptation prevents most sharks from surviving in freshwater, and they are therefore confined to marine environments. A few exceptions exist, such as the bull shark , which has developed a way to change its kidney function to excrete large amounts of urea.

The food moves from the mouth to a J-shaped stomach, where it is stored and initial digestion occurs. This short length is achieved by the spiral valve with multiple turns within a single short section instead of a long tube-like intestine.

The valve provides a long surface area, requiring food to circulate inside the short gut until fully digested, when remaining waste products pass into the cloaca. Sharks have keen olfactory senses, located in the short duct which is not fused, unlike bony fish between the anterior and posterior nasal openings, with some species able to detect as little as one part per million of blood in seawater.

They are more attracted to the chemicals found in the intestines of many species, and as a result often linger near or in sewage outfalls. Some species, such as nurse sharks , have external barbels that greatly increase their ability to sense prey.

Sight Eye of a Bigeyed sixgill shark Hexanchus nakamurai Shark eyes are similar to the eyes of other vertebrates , including similar lenses , corneas and retinas , though their eyesight is well adapted to the marine environment with the help of a tissue called tapetum lucidum. This tissue is behind the retina and reflects light back to it, thereby increasing visibility in the dark waters. The effectiveness of the tissue varies, with some sharks having stronger nocturnal adaptations.

Many sharks can contract and dilate their pupils , like humans, something no teleost fish can do. Sharks have eyelids, but they do not blink because the surrounding water cleans their eyes.

To protect their eyes some species have nictitating membranes. This membrane covers the eyes while hunting and when the shark is being attacked. However, some species, including the great white shark Carcharodon carcharias , do not have this membrane, but instead roll their eyes backwards to protect them when striking prey.

The importance of sight in shark hunting behavior is debated. Some believe that electro- and chemoreception are more significant, while others point to the nictating membrane as evidence that sight is important.

Presumably, the shark would not protect its eyes were they unimportant. The use of sight probably varies with species and water conditions. The shark's field of vision can swap between monocular and stereoscopic at any time.

The remaining seven species had in addition to rods a single type of cone photoreceptor sensitive to green and, seeing only in shades of grey and green, are believed to be effectively colorblind.

The study indicates that an object's contrast against the background, rather than colour, may be more important for object detection. The lateral line shows a similar arrangement, and is open to the environment via a series of openings called lateral line pores. This is a reminder of the common origin of these two vibration- and sound-detecting organs that are grouped together as the acoustico-lateralis system.

In bony fish and tetrapods the external opening into the inner ear has been lost. Electromagnetic field receptors ampullae of Lorenzini and motion detecting canals in the head of a shark Electroreception Main article: Electroreception The ampullae of Lorenzini are the electroreceptor organs. They number in the hundreds to thousands. Sharks use the ampullae of Lorenzini to detect the electromagnetic fields that all living things produce.

The shark has the greatest electrical sensitivity of any animal. Sharks find prey hidden in sand by detecting the electric fields they produce. Ocean currents moving in the magnetic field of the Earth also generate electric fields that sharks can use for orientation and possibly navigation. Lateral line This system is found in most fish, including sharks.

It detects motion or vibrations in water. Most live 20 to 30 years. The spiny dogfish has one of the longest lifespans at more than years. Fecundity in sharks ranges from 2 to over young per reproductive cycle. For example, lemon sharks reach sexual maturity at around age 13— In less flexible species the two sharks swim parallel to each other while the male inserts a clasper into the female's oviduct. Females in many of the larger species have bite marks that appear to be a result of a male grasping them to maintain position during mating.

The bite marks may also come from courtship behavior: In some species, females have evolved thicker skin to withstand these bites.

The extent of this behavior in the wild is unknown. Mammals are now the only major vertebrate group in which asexual reproduction has not been observed. Scientists say that asexual reproduction in the wild is rare, and probably a last-ditch effort to reproduce when a mate is not present.

Asexual reproduction diminishes genetic diversity , which helps build defenses against threats to the species. Species that rely solely on it risk extinction. Asexual reproduction may have contributed to the blue shark 's decline off the Irish coast. The young continue to be nourished by the remnants of the yolk and the oviduct's fluids. As in viviparity, the young are born alive and fully functional.

Lamniforme sharks practice oophagy , where the first embryos to hatch eat the remaining eggs. Taking this a step further, sand tiger shark pups cannibalistically consume neighboring embryos. The survival strategy for ovoviviparous species is to brood the young to a comparatively large size before birth. The whale shark is now classified as ovoviviparous rather than oviparous, because extrauterine eggs are now thought to have been aborted.

Most ovoviviparous sharks give birth in sheltered areas, including bays, river mouths and shallow reefs. They choose such areas for protection from predators mainly other sharks and the abundance of food.

Shark in the blue sex games

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