Same sex marriage wedding invitations. How to Address an Invitation to a Same-Sex Couple.



Same sex marriage wedding invitations

Same sex marriage wedding invitations

Corbin Gurkin Brides and grooms inviting a same-sex couple to their wedding may wonder about the proper way to address the invitation. In general, the etiquette of invitation addressing varies from couple to couple, and is often influenced by the formality of your wedding. Unmarried Couple If the same-sex couple isn't married, you should address each person individually with the appropriate title.

Write each name on a separate line, the same way you would address an invitation to an opposite-sex unmarried couple. The order of the names doesn't typically matter, but if you're in doubt, arrange them alphabetically. Note that some same-sex couples remain unmarried for legal reasons, but still consider themselves a permanent pair. In this scenario, you can put the two names on one line and separate them by "and. Dan Brown and Mr. John Smith" or "Mrs.

Amanda Jones and Mrs. Again, you might consider ordering the names alphabetically. Another way of addressing the invitations of same-sex married couples is with the plural form of the title. This especially applies when the married same-sex couple has the same last name.

For men, you could write "The Messrs. Dan Smith and Mr. John Smith" although the latter is also correct, and can be used if preferred.

Amanda Williams and Mrs. Jane Williams" if preferred. These same rules apply if the couple has a hyphenated last name. When in doubt, consider asking the couple for their preferred greeting. They likely won't mind the inquiry, and you can prevent making a mistake in your invitations.

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Same sex marriage wedding invitations

Corbin Gurkin Brides and grooms inviting a same-sex couple to their wedding may wonder about the proper way to address the invitation. In general, the etiquette of invitation addressing varies from couple to couple, and is often influenced by the formality of your wedding. Unmarried Couple If the same-sex couple isn't married, you should address each person individually with the appropriate title. Write each name on a separate line, the same way you would address an invitation to an opposite-sex unmarried couple.

The order of the names doesn't typically matter, but if you're in doubt, arrange them alphabetically. Note that some same-sex couples remain unmarried for legal reasons, but still consider themselves a permanent pair. In this scenario, you can put the two names on one line and separate them by "and. Dan Brown and Mr. John Smith" or "Mrs. Amanda Jones and Mrs. Again, you might consider ordering the names alphabetically.

Another way of addressing the invitations of same-sex married couples is with the plural form of the title. This especially applies when the married same-sex couple has the same last name. For men, you could write "The Messrs. Dan Smith and Mr. John Smith" although the latter is also correct, and can be used if preferred. Amanda Williams and Mrs. Jane Williams" if preferred. These same rules apply if the couple has a hyphenated last name.

When in doubt, consider asking the couple for their preferred greeting. They likely won't mind the inquiry, and you can prevent making a mistake in your invitations.

Same sex marriage wedding invitations

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4 Comments

  1. The order of the names doesn't typically matter, but if you're in doubt, arrange them alphabetically.

  2. Pin it Another neat and tidy way to decide whose name is listed first is the classic alphabetical order by last name.

  3. While social norms may not have caught up with the times, we should strive to move forward, rather than rest upon traditions that no longer fit the times nor our lives. When preparing wedding invitations or announcements, there are a myriad of books available giving the correct protocol for which names appear, and in what order on an invitation. Write each name on a separate line, the same way you would address an invitation to an opposite-sex unmarried couple.

  4. While social norms may not have caught up with the times, we should strive to move forward, rather than rest upon traditions that no longer fit the times nor our lives. They likely won't mind the inquiry, and you can prevent making a mistake in your invitations. Pin it Another neat and tidy way to decide whose name is listed first is the classic alphabetical order by last name.

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