Response to americas war on sex. Marty Klein.



Response to americas war on sex

Response to americas war on sex

Early life[ edit ] Klein grew up in Brooklyn, New York. While still in elementary school he began to play the recorder and to collect stamps, interests he has continued throughout his life. Collecting stamps led to a lifelong interest in geography and history. He later wrote on these topics frequently when he began to lecture and travel internationally. In the Los Angeles Times published his op-ed piece on contraceptive advertising; together these two outlets began his career as a professional writer.

First as a volunteer and then as a staff member, Klein worked for the Santa Barbara branch of Planned Parenthood While there he became intrigued with the recurring experience of women returning for pregnancy tests multiple times despite being prescribed or given various types of contraception.

These women's explanations surprised him: He also received a grant from the state Office of Family Planning relating to male sexuality. His interest already piqued by his experiences at the clinic, he began his career in human sexuality.

He has given several media interviews and written blog posts about his views on topics such sexuality in the media, pornography, and children and sexuality. For example, a New York Times article on the phenomenon of self-help books about sexual positions, sex fantasies and increasingly edgy materials stated that the genre is big business, aimed at women and promoting the idea that "It is a woman's role to ensure that the couple's sex life remains satisfying. He calls this the "Oprah-ization" factor, where talk shows like Oprah and Dr.

Phil will, for example, put teen prostitutes on stage and talk about how awful it is. What they are really doing, according to Klein, is showing teen girls in skimpy clothing talking about sex, which results in voyeuristic viewers.

The key message in American culture is that sex is dangerous. But sex isn't dangerous, bad sexual decision making is dangerous. He states that there is no evidence for this, but the idea appeals intuitively to many people.

Thus instead of looking at the actual causal factors of crime, they seek to ban pornography, strip clubs and other outlets to reduce it. Now most Americans reach puberty around ages 10—12 but they delay marriage into their late 20's. He explained that he wrote this book in response to Broadband internet making porn more available - and the accompanying increase in women complaining about their men viewing porn, as well as to help improve sexual literacy of both adults and minors.

Host Steven Novella asked Klein if anti-pornography groups are trying to justify their opposition by citing health concerns or were just confused about the science. Klein responded that both are true. He observed that couples that don't have sex anymore are quicker to fight about pornography rather than have a meaningful conversation about problems in their sexual relationships. Cara Santa Maria asked if porn leads to unrealistic expectations by men. In Europe most beaches are clothing optional, yet in America nudity on beaches is a crime.

And one of the things those kids decide when they are adults is that 'if there's something wrong with my sexuality, there must be something wrong with everyone else's sexuality. And, therefore, it's not only my sexuality that I need to repress, it's other people's sexuality that I need to be concerned about, too. Further, he has been critical of laws which make it risky for parents to take photos of their children in the bathtub, or for teenagers to take sexual photos of themselves for their own private use.

In addition, he has spoken out against the way he sees teens being treated as a sexually repressed minority, such as the criminalization and punishment of teen "sexting," and the deliberate withholding of sexual information and sexual health products from them.

He responded that it depends on the child, since a younger child will probably not notice the conversation, and older children will need additional information and it is best for parents to respond honestly in a way that reflects their values. A teenager will need to understand what is real and what is fictional entertainment. In all cases, Klein said, it is important to listen, remain calm and make sure the child knows they are not a bad person for having sex questions and that they can ask the parent anything.

Children don't need our help to think about sex There are groups of people out there who are devoted to scaring the heck out of Americans about sexuality It makes some people feel good because they say, 'Aha, there's the enemy and if only we could do something about that, everything would be better.

Parents need to educate their children and increase their sexual literacy, so that they understand that what they are seeing on the Internet is fantasy. One breast is bigger than the other, one nipple has a few stray hairs, your penis is exactly the size it is. Focussing on distracting stuff does. Nothing wrong with that if it works for you. In fact, wilder actually pulls some people away from the connection and focus that can make sex enjoyable.

Klein believed then - and continues to believe - that the concept of "sex addiction" is primarily a set of moralistic judgements dressed up as clinical theory. He has written that the concept is a simplistic explanation of poor sexual decision-making that demonizes sexuality. He says it ignores the roles of culture, religion and the psychological means of sex for individuals while portraying sexual desires as dangerous, often unhealthy and in need of strict control channeled into the one proper form of sexual expression.

Klein has reservations that sex-addiction exists and believes that an addiction movement whose agenda is based on false assumptions is harmful to patients and to society, namely: It is unknown, according to Klein, if the sex addiction movement realized that its ideas would become politically exploited.

Regardless of their intentions, this is what activists, government and the media have done in order to discredit the profession of sexology. Issues such as culture, religion, age and disorders must be taken into account. He states that society needs to come up with "sex-positive" models of "sexual health". These models should reflect good education for children as well as for adults, while being sensitive across different cultures.

There is no serious evaluation, just "Hello Joe, welcome to the group". Joe may suffer from other problems that will not be helped by a twelve-step program, and may in fact be made worse. Anti porn crusaders like to use the phrase "violent porn" as if it is one word. The good news is that most pornography is not violent.

Plaintiffs, which included Marty Klein, challenged the law arguing that it violated the First and Fourteenth Amendments, and it was ruled unconstitutional in June Plaintiffs including Klein sought to have the Internet removed, claiming the law was far too broad contrary to the First Amendment. This would have criminalized any material posted on the Internet that might be considered harmful if viewed by a minor.

The plaintiffs argued that this could "potentially ban constitutionally protected speech about art, literature, sexual health and other topics. Marty Klein was the only individual among the various institutional plaintiffs. Thus the law would threaten Internet users nationwide and even worldwide.

All the photos on his blog are his own. Klein details what he describes as a well-coordinated, deeply funded war on sexuality which is being fought on many fronts. Klein challenges American society's and psychotherapy's assumptions about sexuality; he is particularly critical of what he calls the "Sexual Disaster Industry" and the "Oprah-ization" of psychotherapy and medicine. Klein, Marty; Robbins, Riki Let Me Count the Ways: Discovering Great Sex Without Intercourse.

America's War on Sex: His Porn, Her Pain:

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America's War on Sex: Dr. Marty Klein



Response to americas war on sex

Early life[ edit ] Klein grew up in Brooklyn, New York. While still in elementary school he began to play the recorder and to collect stamps, interests he has continued throughout his life. Collecting stamps led to a lifelong interest in geography and history.

He later wrote on these topics frequently when he began to lecture and travel internationally. In the Los Angeles Times published his op-ed piece on contraceptive advertising; together these two outlets began his career as a professional writer.

First as a volunteer and then as a staff member, Klein worked for the Santa Barbara branch of Planned Parenthood While there he became intrigued with the recurring experience of women returning for pregnancy tests multiple times despite being prescribed or given various types of contraception. These women's explanations surprised him: He also received a grant from the state Office of Family Planning relating to male sexuality.

His interest already piqued by his experiences at the clinic, he began his career in human sexuality. He has given several media interviews and written blog posts about his views on topics such sexuality in the media, pornography, and children and sexuality.

For example, a New York Times article on the phenomenon of self-help books about sexual positions, sex fantasies and increasingly edgy materials stated that the genre is big business, aimed at women and promoting the idea that "It is a woman's role to ensure that the couple's sex life remains satisfying.

He calls this the "Oprah-ization" factor, where talk shows like Oprah and Dr. Phil will, for example, put teen prostitutes on stage and talk about how awful it is. What they are really doing, according to Klein, is showing teen girls in skimpy clothing talking about sex, which results in voyeuristic viewers.

The key message in American culture is that sex is dangerous. But sex isn't dangerous, bad sexual decision making is dangerous. He states that there is no evidence for this, but the idea appeals intuitively to many people. Thus instead of looking at the actual causal factors of crime, they seek to ban pornography, strip clubs and other outlets to reduce it.

Now most Americans reach puberty around ages 10—12 but they delay marriage into their late 20's. He explained that he wrote this book in response to Broadband internet making porn more available - and the accompanying increase in women complaining about their men viewing porn, as well as to help improve sexual literacy of both adults and minors. Host Steven Novella asked Klein if anti-pornography groups are trying to justify their opposition by citing health concerns or were just confused about the science.

Klein responded that both are true. He observed that couples that don't have sex anymore are quicker to fight about pornography rather than have a meaningful conversation about problems in their sexual relationships.

Cara Santa Maria asked if porn leads to unrealistic expectations by men. In Europe most beaches are clothing optional, yet in America nudity on beaches is a crime. And one of the things those kids decide when they are adults is that 'if there's something wrong with my sexuality, there must be something wrong with everyone else's sexuality.

And, therefore, it's not only my sexuality that I need to repress, it's other people's sexuality that I need to be concerned about, too. Further, he has been critical of laws which make it risky for parents to take photos of their children in the bathtub, or for teenagers to take sexual photos of themselves for their own private use.

In addition, he has spoken out against the way he sees teens being treated as a sexually repressed minority, such as the criminalization and punishment of teen "sexting," and the deliberate withholding of sexual information and sexual health products from them. He responded that it depends on the child, since a younger child will probably not notice the conversation, and older children will need additional information and it is best for parents to respond honestly in a way that reflects their values.

A teenager will need to understand what is real and what is fictional entertainment. In all cases, Klein said, it is important to listen, remain calm and make sure the child knows they are not a bad person for having sex questions and that they can ask the parent anything. Children don't need our help to think about sex There are groups of people out there who are devoted to scaring the heck out of Americans about sexuality It makes some people feel good because they say, 'Aha, there's the enemy and if only we could do something about that, everything would be better.

Parents need to educate their children and increase their sexual literacy, so that they understand that what they are seeing on the Internet is fantasy. One breast is bigger than the other, one nipple has a few stray hairs, your penis is exactly the size it is. Focussing on distracting stuff does. Nothing wrong with that if it works for you. In fact, wilder actually pulls some people away from the connection and focus that can make sex enjoyable.

Klein believed then - and continues to believe - that the concept of "sex addiction" is primarily a set of moralistic judgements dressed up as clinical theory. He has written that the concept is a simplistic explanation of poor sexual decision-making that demonizes sexuality. He says it ignores the roles of culture, religion and the psychological means of sex for individuals while portraying sexual desires as dangerous, often unhealthy and in need of strict control channeled into the one proper form of sexual expression.

Klein has reservations that sex-addiction exists and believes that an addiction movement whose agenda is based on false assumptions is harmful to patients and to society, namely: It is unknown, according to Klein, if the sex addiction movement realized that its ideas would become politically exploited. Regardless of their intentions, this is what activists, government and the media have done in order to discredit the profession of sexology. Issues such as culture, religion, age and disorders must be taken into account.

He states that society needs to come up with "sex-positive" models of "sexual health". These models should reflect good education for children as well as for adults, while being sensitive across different cultures. There is no serious evaluation, just "Hello Joe, welcome to the group". Joe may suffer from other problems that will not be helped by a twelve-step program, and may in fact be made worse.

Anti porn crusaders like to use the phrase "violent porn" as if it is one word. The good news is that most pornography is not violent.

Plaintiffs, which included Marty Klein, challenged the law arguing that it violated the First and Fourteenth Amendments, and it was ruled unconstitutional in June Plaintiffs including Klein sought to have the Internet removed, claiming the law was far too broad contrary to the First Amendment. This would have criminalized any material posted on the Internet that might be considered harmful if viewed by a minor.

The plaintiffs argued that this could "potentially ban constitutionally protected speech about art, literature, sexual health and other topics. Marty Klein was the only individual among the various institutional plaintiffs.

Thus the law would threaten Internet users nationwide and even worldwide. All the photos on his blog are his own. Klein details what he describes as a well-coordinated, deeply funded war on sexuality which is being fought on many fronts.

Klein challenges American society's and psychotherapy's assumptions about sexuality; he is particularly critical of what he calls the "Sexual Disaster Industry" and the "Oprah-ization" of psychotherapy and medicine. Klein, Marty; Robbins, Riki Let Me Count the Ways: Discovering Great Sex Without Intercourse. America's War on Sex: His Porn, Her Pain:

Response to americas war on sex

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1 Comments

  1. Now most Americans reach puberty around ages 10—12 but they delay marriage into their late 20's. Phil will, for example, put teen prostitutes on stage and talk about how awful it is.

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