Hilary swank topless sex scene. XVIDEOS.COM.



Hilary swank topless sex scene

Hilary swank topless sex scene

Brandon Teena Brandon Teena was a trans man who was gang raped and murdered by a group of male acquaintances in December , when he was With the intensity of his desire to turn himself into a boy, the fact that he did it with no role models. The leap of imagination that this person took was completely overwhelming to me.

She was familiar with Brandon's desire to wear men's clothing: People were focusing on the spectacle of a girl who had passed as a boy because that is so unfamiliar to so many people. Where to me, I knew girls who had passed as boys, so Brandon was not some weird person to me.

Brandon was a very familiar person. Diane Keaton 's production company, Blue Relief, showed interest in the screenplay in the mids. Initially, the film was to be largely based on Aphrodite Jones ' true crime book All She Wanted, which told the story of Brandon's final few weeks. However, Peirce modified the script to fit her vision to focus on the relationship between Brandon and his year-old girlfriend Lana Tisdel, which Peirce termed a "great love story", [11] [18] in contrast to All She Wanted, which did not place an emphasis on the relationship.

They worked together for 18 months on the final drafts and were careful not to "mythologize" Brandon; the aim was to keep him as human as possible. She met Lana Tisdel at a convenience store and interviewed her at Tisdel's home. However, she was unable to interview Brandon's mother or any of his biological family. When confronted about the lies, Swank told Peirce "but that's what Brandon would do" and she was eventually cast in the film. To prepare for the role, Swank lived as a man for one month.

The filmmakers retained the names of most of the case's real-life protagonists, but the names of several supporting characters were altered. For example, the character of Candace was named Lisa Lambert in real life. Peirce said the LGBT community was very interested in the project because of the publicity surrounding the murder.

At one point, the project was nearly abandoned because Peirce was not satisfied with most of the people who auditioned. Swank said that like Brandon she was 21 years of age. When Peirce later confronted her about her lie, Swank responded, "But that's what Brandon would do". Her masquerade was convincing; Swank's neighbors believed the "young man" coming and going from her home was Swank's visiting brother. She reduced her body fat to seven percent to accentuate her facial structure and refused to let the cast and crew see her out of costume.

Kimberly Peirce, however, believed the actress would be better cast as Lana Tisdel. When I saw that, and her confidence and wit, I thought: I said to her, 'Will you please audition to play Lana? She watched videos of Lana. She just became her very naturally. Sarsgaard was one of the first choices for the role. He later said he wanted his character to be "likable, sympathetic even", because he wanted the audience "to understand why they would hang out with me.

If my character wasn't necessarily likable, I wanted him to be charismatic enough that you weren't going to have a dull time if you were with him. I felt like I was just like the sheriff, y'know, and that everyone loved me. Initially, Boys Don't Cry was scheduled to film for thirty days. The small budget dictated some of the filming decisions, including the omission of some incidents to speed up the overall pacing. Timing constraints and Peirce's visions relating to the plot limited what could be achieved with the narrative.

At the time, he had been dating Lana Tisdel's sister, Leslie, who was omitted from the story. Most of the incidents in the case took place in Falls City, Nebraska , [47] [48] but budget constraints led the filmmakers to choose locations in Texas. I wanted the audience to enter deeply into this place, this character, so they could entertain these contradictions in Brandon's own mind and would not think he was crazy, would not think he was lying, but would see him as more deeply human".

The scene in which Brandon, at the wishes of his friends, bumper-skis on the back of a pickup truck, was delayed when a police officer, just arriving at a shift change, required a large lighting crane to be moved from one side of the road to the other.

The scenes took six hours to shoot and were filmed at sunrise, resulting in a blue sky being seen in the background. Swank required a stunt double for a scene in which she falls off the back of a truck. Teena's rape scene was given an extended filming time; Sexton, who portrayed one of the attackers, walked away in tears afterward. When scenes became difficult, Swank requested the company of her husband on set.

Peirce had intended the roller skate scene to be a metaphor for Brandon's formal entrance into masculinity. This image illustrates the dim lighting used throughout the film, giving a particular emphasis on artificial light stemming from the film's focus on confined interiors.

Peirce, who had originally sought a career in photography before moving into filmmaking, applied techniques she had learned into the film. As a way to further incorporate the sense of artificial night, John Pirozzi, who had been experimenting with time-lapse photography using a non-motion-controlled moving camera, was invited to create the transition shots seen throughout the film.

The film was shot with a Moviecam Compact camera fitted with Carl Zeiss super speed lenses. For the scene in which Brandon is stripped, a hand-held camera was used to give a sense of subjectivity and intimacy.

The use of low natural light and heavy artificial light is illustrated early in the film in the opening roller rink scene in which Brandon pursues his first relationship with a young woman. For this scene, Peirce used a three-shot method similar to that used in a scene in The Wizard of Oz in which Dorothy leaves her house and enters Oz. Some scenes were given a prolonged shooting sequence to induce a feeling of hallucination. An example is the sequence in which Brandon and Lana first have sex, followed by a shot of her, Brandon, Candace, and Kate driving in a car against a city skyline backdrop.

The scene took an hour and a half to film in total. Nathan Larson and Nina Persson of The Cardigans composed an instrumental version of Restless Heart 's country-pop song " The Bluest Eyes in Texas ", a variation of which was used as the film's love theme and score.

The title of the film is taken from the song of the same name by British rock band The Cure. An American cover of the song, sung by Nathan Larson, plays in the background in the scene in which Lana bails Brandon out of jail and during one of their sex scenes. However, the song is not included on the released soundtrack. The soundtrack was released on November 23, , by Koch Records. Roger Ebert described the film as a "romantic tragedy" embedded in a working class American setting, calling it "Romeo and Juliet set in a Nebraska trailer park".

It's about these guys whose world is so tenuous and so fragile that they can't stand to have any of their beliefs shattered", referring to John and Tom's views of their lives, Brandon's aspirations and his biological sex. Carol Siegel regarded the film as a thematically rich love story between two ill-fated lovers, similarly to Romeo and Juliet. This tragic aspect of the love story led Halberstam to compare Brandon and Lana's relationship and subsequent drama to classic and modern romances including Romeo and Juliet, often using the term star-crossed lovers.

She opined that Brandon wanted to create close relationships, but he could not due to his transgender status until he became close with Lana. He consistently faces a sense of fear related to the power-over dynamics that he and others who are transsexual face…Brandon experiences the central relational paradox, in which he yearns for connection; however, due to the real threat he faces, he is unable to make that connection. John cannot abide Brandon's desire, and clear ability, to access male privilege , and his reaction is to force Brandon to be female through the act of rape.

Other commentators discussed the more complex psychological causes of Brandon's murder. Halberstam commented on the complicated causes of the murder, and whether it was due to transphobia or homophobia: An allegiance with Brandon's outsider status aligns the viewer with Brandon's initial exhilaration at his transgressive success as a boy, drawing us through to the film's disturbing finale.

In her film, Pierce [sic] inserts the unconventional problems of transsexuality into a conventional narrative structure. Throughout the film Brandon is presented as a doomed, though beguiling and beautiful rascal, recognizably located in the lineage of well-known cinematic bad-boys like James Dean, Steve McQueen, and Paul Newman. Like these predecessors, Brandon's heroic stature derives from her [sic] unwillingness to compromise her [sic] identity … Pierce [sic] presents Brandon's struggles against biological determinism as the struggles of a dignified renegade.

When Brandon tries to establish his male identity with his new buddies, he imitates the kind of overly aggressive macho machismo that John and Tom represent. But Lana falls for Brandon because of his version of masculinity, which contradicts and challenges traditional assumptions about what it takes to be a man and to please a woman.

His masculinity is carefully scripted. John and Tom…are never shown preparing for masculinity. They are already masculine. In addition, she regarded John and Tom's rape of Brandon as an attempt to psychologically castrate him. She wrote, "On some level Brandon's story, while cleaving to its own specificity, needs to remain an open narrative—not a stable narrative of FTM transsexual identity nor a singular tale of queer bashing, not a cautionary fable about the violence of rural America nor an advertisement for urban organizations of queer community; like the narrative of Billy Tipton, Brandon's story permits a dream of transformation.

Within this universe of feeling and reaction structured by lack and tinted blue by country lyrics and a protective and threatening night-time light, characters imbricate gender and class through their longings for love, acceptance and a better life.

But the effects are familiar ones in the history of racist representations. The erasure of DeVine from the narrative places the white female bodies as the only true victims of crime; and the film's inability to show DeVine as violated rather than violator perpetuates the myth of the black man as always already a perpetrator of crime.

Race is not incidental to this narrative of mostly white, Midwestern small towns and by omitting DeVine's story from Boys Don't Cry, Peirce contributes to the detachment of transgender narratives from narratives about race, consigning the memory of DeVine to oblivion.

Several authors commented on the possible impact that the film's setting of Falls City, Nebraska, located in the Midwestern United States, could have had on the film's plot.

Maslin called Boys Don't Cry a tale of a trapped, small town character's search for life beyond the rural existence and the high price he pays for his view of the "American dream". Some of these narratives are narratives of hate, some of desire; others tell of ignorance and brutality; still others of isolation and fear; some allow violence and ignorant prejudices to become the essence of white poor rural identity; still others provoke questions about the deployment of whiteness and the regulation of violence.

It is virtually timeless. There is also a sense of both place and placelessness. While the landscape is distinctively Plains, it could be described as nowhere. Candace and Lana's homes appear to be on the outskirts of town, or even outside of town.

There are no complete families, only the family that that has been created. The men appear to have no homes, relationally or physically: The Plains frontier landscape as it is constructed in Boys Don't Cry is dark, literally and figuratively. Most of the scenes are set at night, utilizing night Plains skies with time-lapse clouds, heightening the isolation. Film frames of placeless and timeless. The community also is dark.

It is marginal, just managing to get along, and in the end deadly. While the classic Western dichotomy of men associated with exteriors and women with interiors is apparent, so too is Brandon's border-crossing.

He appears to be able to easily handle both landscapes, yet belong to neither.

Video by theme:

Hilary Swank Dishes on Her Surprising Tommy Lee Jones Sex Scene



Hilary swank topless sex scene

Brandon Teena Brandon Teena was a trans man who was gang raped and murdered by a group of male acquaintances in December , when he was With the intensity of his desire to turn himself into a boy, the fact that he did it with no role models.

The leap of imagination that this person took was completely overwhelming to me. She was familiar with Brandon's desire to wear men's clothing: People were focusing on the spectacle of a girl who had passed as a boy because that is so unfamiliar to so many people.

Where to me, I knew girls who had passed as boys, so Brandon was not some weird person to me. Brandon was a very familiar person. Diane Keaton 's production company, Blue Relief, showed interest in the screenplay in the mids. Initially, the film was to be largely based on Aphrodite Jones ' true crime book All She Wanted, which told the story of Brandon's final few weeks.

However, Peirce modified the script to fit her vision to focus on the relationship between Brandon and his year-old girlfriend Lana Tisdel, which Peirce termed a "great love story", [11] [18] in contrast to All She Wanted, which did not place an emphasis on the relationship.

They worked together for 18 months on the final drafts and were careful not to "mythologize" Brandon; the aim was to keep him as human as possible.

She met Lana Tisdel at a convenience store and interviewed her at Tisdel's home. However, she was unable to interview Brandon's mother or any of his biological family. When confronted about the lies, Swank told Peirce "but that's what Brandon would do" and she was eventually cast in the film. To prepare for the role, Swank lived as a man for one month. The filmmakers retained the names of most of the case's real-life protagonists, but the names of several supporting characters were altered.

For example, the character of Candace was named Lisa Lambert in real life. Peirce said the LGBT community was very interested in the project because of the publicity surrounding the murder. At one point, the project was nearly abandoned because Peirce was not satisfied with most of the people who auditioned. Swank said that like Brandon she was 21 years of age. When Peirce later confronted her about her lie, Swank responded, "But that's what Brandon would do".

Her masquerade was convincing; Swank's neighbors believed the "young man" coming and going from her home was Swank's visiting brother. She reduced her body fat to seven percent to accentuate her facial structure and refused to let the cast and crew see her out of costume.

Kimberly Peirce, however, believed the actress would be better cast as Lana Tisdel. When I saw that, and her confidence and wit, I thought: I said to her, 'Will you please audition to play Lana?

She watched videos of Lana. She just became her very naturally. Sarsgaard was one of the first choices for the role. He later said he wanted his character to be "likable, sympathetic even", because he wanted the audience "to understand why they would hang out with me. If my character wasn't necessarily likable, I wanted him to be charismatic enough that you weren't going to have a dull time if you were with him. I felt like I was just like the sheriff, y'know, and that everyone loved me.

Initially, Boys Don't Cry was scheduled to film for thirty days. The small budget dictated some of the filming decisions, including the omission of some incidents to speed up the overall pacing. Timing constraints and Peirce's visions relating to the plot limited what could be achieved with the narrative. At the time, he had been dating Lana Tisdel's sister, Leslie, who was omitted from the story.

Most of the incidents in the case took place in Falls City, Nebraska , [47] [48] but budget constraints led the filmmakers to choose locations in Texas.

I wanted the audience to enter deeply into this place, this character, so they could entertain these contradictions in Brandon's own mind and would not think he was crazy, would not think he was lying, but would see him as more deeply human". The scene in which Brandon, at the wishes of his friends, bumper-skis on the back of a pickup truck, was delayed when a police officer, just arriving at a shift change, required a large lighting crane to be moved from one side of the road to the other.

The scenes took six hours to shoot and were filmed at sunrise, resulting in a blue sky being seen in the background. Swank required a stunt double for a scene in which she falls off the back of a truck. Teena's rape scene was given an extended filming time; Sexton, who portrayed one of the attackers, walked away in tears afterward. When scenes became difficult, Swank requested the company of her husband on set. Peirce had intended the roller skate scene to be a metaphor for Brandon's formal entrance into masculinity.

This image illustrates the dim lighting used throughout the film, giving a particular emphasis on artificial light stemming from the film's focus on confined interiors. Peirce, who had originally sought a career in photography before moving into filmmaking, applied techniques she had learned into the film. As a way to further incorporate the sense of artificial night, John Pirozzi, who had been experimenting with time-lapse photography using a non-motion-controlled moving camera, was invited to create the transition shots seen throughout the film.

The film was shot with a Moviecam Compact camera fitted with Carl Zeiss super speed lenses. For the scene in which Brandon is stripped, a hand-held camera was used to give a sense of subjectivity and intimacy.

The use of low natural light and heavy artificial light is illustrated early in the film in the opening roller rink scene in which Brandon pursues his first relationship with a young woman. For this scene, Peirce used a three-shot method similar to that used in a scene in The Wizard of Oz in which Dorothy leaves her house and enters Oz.

Some scenes were given a prolonged shooting sequence to induce a feeling of hallucination. An example is the sequence in which Brandon and Lana first have sex, followed by a shot of her, Brandon, Candace, and Kate driving in a car against a city skyline backdrop.

The scene took an hour and a half to film in total. Nathan Larson and Nina Persson of The Cardigans composed an instrumental version of Restless Heart 's country-pop song " The Bluest Eyes in Texas ", a variation of which was used as the film's love theme and score. The title of the film is taken from the song of the same name by British rock band The Cure.

An American cover of the song, sung by Nathan Larson, plays in the background in the scene in which Lana bails Brandon out of jail and during one of their sex scenes.

However, the song is not included on the released soundtrack. The soundtrack was released on November 23, , by Koch Records. Roger Ebert described the film as a "romantic tragedy" embedded in a working class American setting, calling it "Romeo and Juliet set in a Nebraska trailer park".

It's about these guys whose world is so tenuous and so fragile that they can't stand to have any of their beliefs shattered", referring to John and Tom's views of their lives, Brandon's aspirations and his biological sex. Carol Siegel regarded the film as a thematically rich love story between two ill-fated lovers, similarly to Romeo and Juliet.

This tragic aspect of the love story led Halberstam to compare Brandon and Lana's relationship and subsequent drama to classic and modern romances including Romeo and Juliet, often using the term star-crossed lovers.

She opined that Brandon wanted to create close relationships, but he could not due to his transgender status until he became close with Lana. He consistently faces a sense of fear related to the power-over dynamics that he and others who are transsexual face…Brandon experiences the central relational paradox, in which he yearns for connection; however, due to the real threat he faces, he is unable to make that connection.

John cannot abide Brandon's desire, and clear ability, to access male privilege , and his reaction is to force Brandon to be female through the act of rape. Other commentators discussed the more complex psychological causes of Brandon's murder. Halberstam commented on the complicated causes of the murder, and whether it was due to transphobia or homophobia: An allegiance with Brandon's outsider status aligns the viewer with Brandon's initial exhilaration at his transgressive success as a boy, drawing us through to the film's disturbing finale.

In her film, Pierce [sic] inserts the unconventional problems of transsexuality into a conventional narrative structure. Throughout the film Brandon is presented as a doomed, though beguiling and beautiful rascal, recognizably located in the lineage of well-known cinematic bad-boys like James Dean, Steve McQueen, and Paul Newman.

Like these predecessors, Brandon's heroic stature derives from her [sic] unwillingness to compromise her [sic] identity … Pierce [sic] presents Brandon's struggles against biological determinism as the struggles of a dignified renegade. When Brandon tries to establish his male identity with his new buddies, he imitates the kind of overly aggressive macho machismo that John and Tom represent.

But Lana falls for Brandon because of his version of masculinity, which contradicts and challenges traditional assumptions about what it takes to be a man and to please a woman. His masculinity is carefully scripted. John and Tom…are never shown preparing for masculinity.

They are already masculine. In addition, she regarded John and Tom's rape of Brandon as an attempt to psychologically castrate him. She wrote, "On some level Brandon's story, while cleaving to its own specificity, needs to remain an open narrative—not a stable narrative of FTM transsexual identity nor a singular tale of queer bashing, not a cautionary fable about the violence of rural America nor an advertisement for urban organizations of queer community; like the narrative of Billy Tipton, Brandon's story permits a dream of transformation.

Within this universe of feeling and reaction structured by lack and tinted blue by country lyrics and a protective and threatening night-time light, characters imbricate gender and class through their longings for love, acceptance and a better life.

But the effects are familiar ones in the history of racist representations. The erasure of DeVine from the narrative places the white female bodies as the only true victims of crime; and the film's inability to show DeVine as violated rather than violator perpetuates the myth of the black man as always already a perpetrator of crime. Race is not incidental to this narrative of mostly white, Midwestern small towns and by omitting DeVine's story from Boys Don't Cry, Peirce contributes to the detachment of transgender narratives from narratives about race, consigning the memory of DeVine to oblivion.

Several authors commented on the possible impact that the film's setting of Falls City, Nebraska, located in the Midwestern United States, could have had on the film's plot.

Maslin called Boys Don't Cry a tale of a trapped, small town character's search for life beyond the rural existence and the high price he pays for his view of the "American dream". Some of these narratives are narratives of hate, some of desire; others tell of ignorance and brutality; still others of isolation and fear; some allow violence and ignorant prejudices to become the essence of white poor rural identity; still others provoke questions about the deployment of whiteness and the regulation of violence.

It is virtually timeless. There is also a sense of both place and placelessness. While the landscape is distinctively Plains, it could be described as nowhere. Candace and Lana's homes appear to be on the outskirts of town, or even outside of town.

There are no complete families, only the family that that has been created. The men appear to have no homes, relationally or physically: The Plains frontier landscape as it is constructed in Boys Don't Cry is dark, literally and figuratively.

Most of the scenes are set at night, utilizing night Plains skies with time-lapse clouds, heightening the isolation. Film frames of placeless and timeless. The community also is dark. It is marginal, just managing to get along, and in the end deadly.

While the classic Western dichotomy of men associated with exteriors and women with interiors is apparent, so too is Brandon's border-crossing. He appears to be able to easily handle both landscapes, yet belong to neither.

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