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Gay male sex penis probs

Gay male sex penis probs

Find out more Side effects of prostate cancer treatment Depending on what treatment you have, side effects can include problems with erections , urinary problems for example leaking urine , bowel problems and tiredness. Not everyone will be able to have these treatments, so speak to your doctor or nurse to find out more or read more about choosing a treatment.

Consider letting them know about your sexuality and lifestyle so they know how treatment could have an impact on you and so they can give you specific information and support. Find out more about speaking with health professionals below.

Find out more about treatment side effects and ways to manage them on our living with prostate cancer pages. Sexual side effects Having treatment for prostate cancer can affect: For more detailed information on the risks of sexual problems for each different prostate cancer treatment, read our treatment pages.

The way that sexual side effects affect you could depend on your approach to sex, sensuality and intimacy. Experience of sex If you have a partner or you are sexually active then coping with cancer and side effects may have changed your relationship and the way you have sex. Your sex life is unlikely to be the same as it was before cancer - but you don't have to give up on having closeness, pleasure or fun. Keeping some kind of physical closeness alive, in whatever ways possible, can protect or even improve your relationship.

Some men who are the receptive partner during anal sex find that if they have surgery to remove their prostate radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, their experience of sex changes.

With all sexual changes you may be able to find ways to work through this and find new ways of giving and receiving pleasure and keeping closeness or intimacy alive. Find out more about prostate cancer, sex and relationships. You could try using a constriction ring around your penis together with another treatment like tablets such as Viagra , to help keep your erection hard enough for anal sex. There are also other treatments for erection problems such as vacuum pumps, injections and pellets.

Speak to your GP or doctor or nurse at the hospital to find out more about treatments for sexual problems. They might refer you to a specialist service such as an erectile dysfunction ED clinic. Some men also find that the skin inside their anus is more sensitive after radiotherapy. If you are experiencing bowel problems or sensitivity in this area then wait until these issues have subsided before trying anal play or sex.

Although short-term problems in the back passage usually settle down within six weeks of finishing treatment, there can be some permanent changes in the anal canal. Talk to your doctor or nurse for further advice. Use a condom and try extra lubrication once any sensitivity settles down. Use water soluble or silicone-based lubricants; never use oil-based lubricants such as body lotions, massage oils or Vaseline, as they can cause the condom to break.

Cleaning yourself before sex can make you feel more comfortable, but douching can irritate the lining of your back passage, making it more vulnerable to infections. So you may prefer to just clean the external area, rather than cleaning inside. GMFA provide more general advice about douching. Find out more about managing bowel problems. Ejaculation and orgasm After surgery for prostate cancer radical prostatectomy you will no longer be able to ejaculate semen, although you will still be able to have an orgasm.

Some men say that this also changes their experience of sex, but after time some men can adapt to it. Prostate facts for gay and bisexual men This booklet is for gay and bisexual men, and men who have sex with men.

We provide information about prostate cancer and treatment that may be more relevant to you as a gay or bisexual man, or a man who has sex with men. Trans women and prostate cancer Trans women have a prostate and therefore are at risk of prostate cancer and other prostate problems. This information answers particular questions that gay and bisexual men have asked us about HIV and prostate cancer.

There is evidence that some cancers — such as anal cancer, lung cancer and some lymphomas — are more common in people living with HIV. Researchers have looked at whether men with HIV are more likely to develop prostate cancer. But there is research that shows that men with HIV can still benefit from treatments for prostate cancer like surgery and radiotherapy.

It is also very important that your doctors know about all the medication you take, including over-the-counter and herbal remedies and any recreational drugs. Speaking with health professionals Some men find that their doctor or nurse assumes that they are heterosexual. But it can help to let your doctor or nurse know about your sexuality and bring your partner to appointments.

It can be helpful if you want specific information or support, and including your partner or loved one can mean you feel more supported during appointments. It is your right to have the same standard of care and treatment as heterosexual men. But if you feel your rights are not being respected, you can complain. Contact your local Citizens Advice or visit the website for information about how to complain.

You can also get information and support from Stonewall. Including your partner Both same sex marriages and civil partnerships carry the same rights as if you were married to someone of the opposite sex, including in healthcare. Your husband or civil partner has an equal right to be your nearest relative.

This means that they can be involved in decisions about your healthcare. Next of kin can be anybody in your social or family network. Health professionals must respect your wishes about who this is. If you give permission, your partner or friend can: Our Specialist Nurses Ask all the questions you need answers to, or just talk. Our nurses have time for you. Find out more Getting more support All Prostate Cancer UK services are open to everyone, whether you are gay, bisexual, transgender, heterosexual, single or in a relationship.

Partners can also use our services. You may want to talk to gay and bisexual organisations such as:

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Gay male sex penis probs

Find out more Side effects of prostate cancer treatment Depending on what treatment you have, side effects can include problems with erections , urinary problems for example leaking urine , bowel problems and tiredness. Not everyone will be able to have these treatments, so speak to your doctor or nurse to find out more or read more about choosing a treatment. Consider letting them know about your sexuality and lifestyle so they know how treatment could have an impact on you and so they can give you specific information and support.

Find out more about speaking with health professionals below. Find out more about treatment side effects and ways to manage them on our living with prostate cancer pages. Sexual side effects Having treatment for prostate cancer can affect: For more detailed information on the risks of sexual problems for each different prostate cancer treatment, read our treatment pages. The way that sexual side effects affect you could depend on your approach to sex, sensuality and intimacy.

Experience of sex If you have a partner or you are sexually active then coping with cancer and side effects may have changed your relationship and the way you have sex. Your sex life is unlikely to be the same as it was before cancer - but you don't have to give up on having closeness, pleasure or fun.

Keeping some kind of physical closeness alive, in whatever ways possible, can protect or even improve your relationship. Some men who are the receptive partner during anal sex find that if they have surgery to remove their prostate radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, their experience of sex changes.

With all sexual changes you may be able to find ways to work through this and find new ways of giving and receiving pleasure and keeping closeness or intimacy alive. Find out more about prostate cancer, sex and relationships. You could try using a constriction ring around your penis together with another treatment like tablets such as Viagra , to help keep your erection hard enough for anal sex.

There are also other treatments for erection problems such as vacuum pumps, injections and pellets. Speak to your GP or doctor or nurse at the hospital to find out more about treatments for sexual problems. They might refer you to a specialist service such as an erectile dysfunction ED clinic. Some men also find that the skin inside their anus is more sensitive after radiotherapy.

If you are experiencing bowel problems or sensitivity in this area then wait until these issues have subsided before trying anal play or sex. Although short-term problems in the back passage usually settle down within six weeks of finishing treatment, there can be some permanent changes in the anal canal. Talk to your doctor or nurse for further advice. Use a condom and try extra lubrication once any sensitivity settles down. Use water soluble or silicone-based lubricants; never use oil-based lubricants such as body lotions, massage oils or Vaseline, as they can cause the condom to break.

Cleaning yourself before sex can make you feel more comfortable, but douching can irritate the lining of your back passage, making it more vulnerable to infections. So you may prefer to just clean the external area, rather than cleaning inside. GMFA provide more general advice about douching. Find out more about managing bowel problems. Ejaculation and orgasm After surgery for prostate cancer radical prostatectomy you will no longer be able to ejaculate semen, although you will still be able to have an orgasm.

Some men say that this also changes their experience of sex, but after time some men can adapt to it. Prostate facts for gay and bisexual men This booklet is for gay and bisexual men, and men who have sex with men.

We provide information about prostate cancer and treatment that may be more relevant to you as a gay or bisexual man, or a man who has sex with men. Trans women and prostate cancer Trans women have a prostate and therefore are at risk of prostate cancer and other prostate problems.

This information answers particular questions that gay and bisexual men have asked us about HIV and prostate cancer. There is evidence that some cancers — such as anal cancer, lung cancer and some lymphomas — are more common in people living with HIV. Researchers have looked at whether men with HIV are more likely to develop prostate cancer.

But there is research that shows that men with HIV can still benefit from treatments for prostate cancer like surgery and radiotherapy. It is also very important that your doctors know about all the medication you take, including over-the-counter and herbal remedies and any recreational drugs.

Speaking with health professionals Some men find that their doctor or nurse assumes that they are heterosexual. But it can help to let your doctor or nurse know about your sexuality and bring your partner to appointments. It can be helpful if you want specific information or support, and including your partner or loved one can mean you feel more supported during appointments. It is your right to have the same standard of care and treatment as heterosexual men.

But if you feel your rights are not being respected, you can complain. Contact your local Citizens Advice or visit the website for information about how to complain.

You can also get information and support from Stonewall. Including your partner Both same sex marriages and civil partnerships carry the same rights as if you were married to someone of the opposite sex, including in healthcare. Your husband or civil partner has an equal right to be your nearest relative. This means that they can be involved in decisions about your healthcare. Next of kin can be anybody in your social or family network. Health professionals must respect your wishes about who this is.

If you give permission, your partner or friend can: Our Specialist Nurses Ask all the questions you need answers to, or just talk. Our nurses have time for you. Find out more Getting more support All Prostate Cancer UK services are open to everyone, whether you are gay, bisexual, transgender, heterosexual, single or in a relationship. Partners can also use our services. You may want to talk to gay and bisexual organisations such as:

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2 Comments

  1. Your sex life is unlikely to be the same as it was before cancer - but you don't have to give up on having closeness, pleasure or fun.

  2. Ejaculation and orgasm After surgery for prostate cancer radical prostatectomy you will no longer be able to ejaculate semen, although you will still be able to have an orgasm. There is evidence that some cancers — such as anal cancer, lung cancer and some lymphomas — are more common in people living with HIV. Next of kin can be anybody in your social or family network.

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