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Shaffer This book began as part of an extended reflection about the current status of American studies. The process of redesigning the curriculum for the American studies major at Miami University and developing an introductory American studies survey forced me and my colleagues to ask fundamental questions about the field: For me these are deeply personal questions about my responsibility and identity as an American studies scholar.

In developing and teaching the introduction to American studies, I have struggled to promote both cultural competency and cultural agency.

Similarly, in thinking about the curriculum for the major, I have wondered how to move students from detached cultural analysis to active cultural engagement. And as a scholar, I have questioned the insularity and public relevance of purely academic work. I have pondered how to integrate cultural critique with culture change--cultural analysis with cultural agency.

Ultimately, these questions are about public culture. Literary critic Terry Eagleton, in his recent book After Theory, begins with the pronouncement: Although his critique is aimed broadly at the humanities, specifically cultural studies and literary criticism, it is also suggestive for the field of American studies.

At a time when globalization has dramatically expanded the power and reach of multinational corporations, and the war on terror and ideological and political polarization challenge the core principles of participatory democracy in the United States, American studies can benefit from a reconsideration of its organizing topics, themes, and questions. The concept of public culture presented here serves to reframe the work of American studies. Specifically, public culture has the potential to shift the focus of the field beyond its current interest in issues of difference and identity toward new and varied concepts of belonging, collective life, and community as they are played out in multiple forms within a diverse and increasingly global culture.

In The Human Condition, political philosopher Hannah Arendt provides a powerful metaphor for this concept of public culture. She writes, "To live together in the world means essentially that a world of things is between those who have it in common, as a table is located between those who sit around it; the world, like every in-between, relates and separates men at the same time.

The public realm, as the common world, gathers us together and yet prevents our falling over each other, so to speak. Arendt explains, "Only where things can be seen by many in a variety of aspects without changing their identity, so that those who are gathered around them know they see sameness in utter diversity, can worldly reality truly and reliably appear. What Arendt calls the public realm and others have called the public sphere, or public work, is particularly relevant to and offers a range of possibilities for the field of American studies and its ongoing effort to examine and understand American culture.

American studies scholars have long considered public questions, as evidenced by the field''s originating focus on issues of national identity or its history of interest in the idea of a "usable past. However, in the past decades as American studies scholars have moved beyond a problematic Cold War interest in American character, national identity, and American exceptionalism, and shifted toward cultural studies and ethnic studies, the field has retreated from any formal or acknowledged examination of shared public culture in the United States.

That said, "the public" has recently provided a galvanizing theme within the field. Michael Frisch, in his presidential address to the American studies Association in October of , identified four core trajectories that have defined American studies: Contrary to the established conceptualization of American studies, which centers on a linear history that began with what Frisch called "a national project informed by a limited literary-historical interdisciplinarity" and then evolved into a more multidisciplinary multiculturalism informed by cultural studies and transnationalism, he argued that the history of the field is much more multivalent and prismatic.

His assessment suggests that interdisciplinarity, national identity, and multiculturalism have come to be recognized as the dominant narratives of American studies. But he went on to argue the case for the significance of praxis, which he described as "a scholarship with the intellectual capacity to both describe and engage the world more usefully.

Building on the conference theme of crossing borders, he noted, "I am now constantly reminded that one of the most significant borders to cross is the one that separates the academic community from the wider public. I use the term "public culture" to blend the distinctly cultural work of American studies with some of the more focused examinations of civic engagement.

The organizing concept of public culture articulated in this book is grounded in the political theory of Hannah Arendt and John Dewey and also informed by the work of a handful of other scholars, including Harry C. Drawing from this body of work, "public culture" refers to the process of negotiating shared meaning among a diverse group of individuals.

As Dewey explains, publics emerge when "the consequences of conversation extend beyond the two directly concerned," expanding out to "affect the welfare of many others. As Terry Eagleton has pointed out, cultural theory in its current state actively promotes "the absence of memories of collective, and effective, political action.

He concludes, "if this feels like a vacuum, it may also present an opportunity. We need to imagine new forms of belonging, which in our kind of world are bound to be multiple rather than monolithic. The driving intellectual question that had inspired our curricular reexamination focused on a central tension in American studies that existed between acknowledging and understanding the diversity of American culture and defining a collective identity for American culture.

We began with a broad question: How, if at all, do the diverse peoples and groups in the United States come together to create a set of shared values, common experiences, and a shared public culture? Our premise was that despite significant differences, Americans do come together in public to discuss, to negotiate, to debate, and to protest common values, issues, and concerns.

Through this process, people form and reform collective identities and shared public cultures, though provisionally and temporally. Specifically, we sought to address issues of multiculturalism, the formation of social identities, the creation of community, and the construction of collective public identities as they have intersected in contested and complementary ways in localized and national cultures in the United States.

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Shaffer This book began as part of an extended reflection about the current status of American studies. The process of redesigning the curriculum for the American studies major at Miami University and developing an introductory American studies survey forced me and my colleagues to ask fundamental questions about the field: For me these are deeply personal questions about my responsibility and identity as an American studies scholar.

In developing and teaching the introduction to American studies, I have struggled to promote both cultural competency and cultural agency. Similarly, in thinking about the curriculum for the major, I have wondered how to move students from detached cultural analysis to active cultural engagement.

And as a scholar, I have questioned the insularity and public relevance of purely academic work. I have pondered how to integrate cultural critique with culture change--cultural analysis with cultural agency.

Ultimately, these questions are about public culture. Literary critic Terry Eagleton, in his recent book After Theory, begins with the pronouncement: Although his critique is aimed broadly at the humanities, specifically cultural studies and literary criticism, it is also suggestive for the field of American studies.

At a time when globalization has dramatically expanded the power and reach of multinational corporations, and the war on terror and ideological and political polarization challenge the core principles of participatory democracy in the United States, American studies can benefit from a reconsideration of its organizing topics, themes, and questions.

The concept of public culture presented here serves to reframe the work of American studies. Specifically, public culture has the potential to shift the focus of the field beyond its current interest in issues of difference and identity toward new and varied concepts of belonging, collective life, and community as they are played out in multiple forms within a diverse and increasingly global culture.

In The Human Condition, political philosopher Hannah Arendt provides a powerful metaphor for this concept of public culture.

She writes, "To live together in the world means essentially that a world of things is between those who have it in common, as a table is located between those who sit around it; the world, like every in-between, relates and separates men at the same time.

The public realm, as the common world, gathers us together and yet prevents our falling over each other, so to speak. Arendt explains, "Only where things can be seen by many in a variety of aspects without changing their identity, so that those who are gathered around them know they see sameness in utter diversity, can worldly reality truly and reliably appear.

What Arendt calls the public realm and others have called the public sphere, or public work, is particularly relevant to and offers a range of possibilities for the field of American studies and its ongoing effort to examine and understand American culture. American studies scholars have long considered public questions, as evidenced by the field''s originating focus on issues of national identity or its history of interest in the idea of a "usable past.

However, in the past decades as American studies scholars have moved beyond a problematic Cold War interest in American character, national identity, and American exceptionalism, and shifted toward cultural studies and ethnic studies, the field has retreated from any formal or acknowledged examination of shared public culture in the United States.

That said, "the public" has recently provided a galvanizing theme within the field. Michael Frisch, in his presidential address to the American studies Association in October of , identified four core trajectories that have defined American studies: Contrary to the established conceptualization of American studies, which centers on a linear history that began with what Frisch called "a national project informed by a limited literary-historical interdisciplinarity" and then evolved into a more multidisciplinary multiculturalism informed by cultural studies and transnationalism, he argued that the history of the field is much more multivalent and prismatic.

His assessment suggests that interdisciplinarity, national identity, and multiculturalism have come to be recognized as the dominant narratives of American studies. But he went on to argue the case for the significance of praxis, which he described as "a scholarship with the intellectual capacity to both describe and engage the world more usefully.

Building on the conference theme of crossing borders, he noted, "I am now constantly reminded that one of the most significant borders to cross is the one that separates the academic community from the wider public. I use the term "public culture" to blend the distinctly cultural work of American studies with some of the more focused examinations of civic engagement.

The organizing concept of public culture articulated in this book is grounded in the political theory of Hannah Arendt and John Dewey and also informed by the work of a handful of other scholars, including Harry C.

Drawing from this body of work, "public culture" refers to the process of negotiating shared meaning among a diverse group of individuals. As Dewey explains, publics emerge when "the consequences of conversation extend beyond the two directly concerned," expanding out to "affect the welfare of many others.

As Terry Eagleton has pointed out, cultural theory in its current state actively promotes "the absence of memories of collective, and effective, political action. He concludes, "if this feels like a vacuum, it may also present an opportunity.

We need to imagine new forms of belonging, which in our kind of world are bound to be multiple rather than monolithic. The driving intellectual question that had inspired our curricular reexamination focused on a central tension in American studies that existed between acknowledging and understanding the diversity of American culture and defining a collective identity for American culture.

We began with a broad question: How, if at all, do the diverse peoples and groups in the United States come together to create a set of shared values, common experiences, and a shared public culture? Our premise was that despite significant differences, Americans do come together in public to discuss, to negotiate, to debate, and to protest common values, issues, and concerns.

Through this process, people form and reform collective identities and shared public cultures, though provisionally and temporally. Specifically, we sought to address issues of multiculturalism, the formation of social identities, the creation of community, and the construction of collective public identities as they have intersected in contested and complementary ways in localized and national cultures in the United States.

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3 Comments

  1. And as a scholar, I have questioned the insularity and public relevance of purely academic work. As Terry Eagleton has pointed out, cultural theory in its current state actively promotes "the absence of memories of collective, and effective, political action. The public realm, as the common world, gathers us together and yet prevents our falling over each other, so to speak.

  2. American studies scholars have long considered public questions, as evidenced by the field''s originating focus on issues of national identity or its history of interest in the idea of a "usable past.

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